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THE EFFECTS OF TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE ON ADULT PEER TUTORS IN COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 7 months ago

Sheets, R. A., (1994). The effects of training and experience on adult peer tutors in community colleges. Doctoral Dissertation, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

 

This dissertation examines the history and literature and identifies the need for training tutors. It is grounded in research on constructivism and metacognition as foundations for training. The full dissertation is  online and linked to make it easier to move to and view the areas of interest.

 

ABSTRACT

 

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training and experience on tutors. Constructivism and metacognition laid the theoretical foundation for the need, the process, and the outcomes for tutor training. The investigation followed a field study design. Variables were not manipulated; instead, existing variables and interventions were investigated. Four research questions guided the study:

  1. Does tutor training affect a tutor's ability to identify an appropriate course of action with a student?
  2. Does tutoring experience affect a tutor's ability to identify an appropriate course of action with a student?
  3. What other factors contribute to a tutor's ability to identify an appropriate course of action with a student?
  4. What are the relationships between the tutors' abilities to identify an appropriate course of action and their abilities to construct an appropriate course of action?

Two researcher-created instruments were developed for the study. Twenty local and national experts in the field identified the appropriateness of tutor responses on the instruments.

Ten or more hours of training was found to make a significant difference in the appropriateness of tutor responses to presented tutoring situations on the total score. "Active listening and paraphrasing" was the one topic investigated in which one or more hours of training made a significant difference in the appropriateness of tutor responses on a sub-test score.

 

There were no significant differences found in the total score nor sub-test scores among groups based on reported tutoring experience which was acquired during the study.

Four "other" factors also significantly affected the total post-test scores. From the pre-test, two variables had a positive effect: 1) amount of prior related work experience, and 2) the category of "other" as a "Reason for becoming a tutor." From the post-test, two variables when valued by tutors as "Perceived rewards of being a tutor" had a negative effect: 1) "Making money" and 2) "Giving something back."

 

Recommendations were presented 1) for practitioners in the field, and 2) for professionals interested in pursuing additional research to exceed the scope and findings of this study.

 

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